Non-Productive

Dealing with being a woman and a comic book writer, and the fun that ensues

Dealing with being a woman and a comic book writer, and the fun that ensues

Women tell these stories to each other, and they tell them to you at the bar at E3, and you ask if you can write about them, or if they're going to write about them, and you're usually told no. They don't want to deal with the comments, or being labeled a certain way, or to be seen as a trouble-maker. So the vast majority of stories of casual or blatant sexism and harassment tend to go unreported.

Here's a fun game I've stopped playing: If you've ever worked with a female writer, compare your hate mail with hers, especially if you both talk about sexual politics. When I talk about these issues some negative e-mails come in, sure, but I'm rarely threatened with physical or sexual assault. So that's nice. My hate mail rarely involves the penis of the sender. For some reason it's important for people to talk about their penis when they send hate mail to the opposite gender.

This is why it's important to boost the signal and discuss these issues whenever someone does write about their experiences. Sharing these stories is a way to make sure we plant a flag and say that this behavior isn't okay, shouldn't be tolerated, and needs to stop.

What's scary about the linked post is the thoughtless assumption that it's okay to question someone's career and accomplishments due to their gender.